In Memoriam

Thanks to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for hosting Friday Fictioneers! If you’d like to participate, you can find more information here.


claire-sheldon
PHOTO PROMPT © Claire Sheldon

She was six years old sitting on his knee while he balanced the checkbook.

She smiled, the sudden recollection warming her. It felt as if it was yesterday, but nearly fifty years had passed.

Now, he was in a different kind of home and she sat at the same desk and packed up his belongings.

The decision had been painful but necessary. His rapidly declining memory had become an increasing danger.

He had been angry when she moved him, and thrown a tantrum.

She sighed.

She wished she could go back to being the child in their relationship.

A Bad Fiction Novel

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PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Just ahead, she saw the alley in the sunlight. If she could make it she would be safe. Her heart pounded and she felt the package tucked inside her sweater. Father Daniel had trusted her and she couldn’t let him down. She heard footsteps behind her but didn’t turn to look. Father Daniel said if she could make it to the Cathedral, a Friar would be waiting to take possession of the package. Suddenly she felt like she was in a bad novel. She stepped into the sunlight and turned right. Hopefully her story had a happy ending.

Lucky Charm?

ted-struts-in-the-rainPHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

Thank you to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for hosting Friday Fictioneers. If you’d like to participate click here for more information.


Lucky Charm?

“There’s a hurricane coming. You should stay home.” He stared at the darkened sky, inky black in the distance.

“This interview is huge. I can’t miss it. And I have my lucky charm.” She jangled the bracelet he’d given her for their anniversary. “Besides, they won’t run the ferry if it’s not safe.” She kissed him softly, sweetly. “I’ll be fine. Call you tomorrow.”

~ ~ ~ ~

Turning on the morning news, his coffee mug fell and shattered, hot liquid rivulets snaking across the tile floor when he saw the lead story.

FERRYBOAT CAPSIZES – NO SURVIVORS

Things We Lost In The Fire

charred-toys
PHOTO PROMPT © Karuna

“You shouldn’t put yourself through this now.”

She ignored his plea and stepped out of the car into the cold December air.

Standing in borrowed clothes before the charred clapboard skeleton, she took tentative steps forward in the rubble.

She felt confusion and frustration at being lost in her own home.

Finally, she found the playroom and fell to her knees, hands sifting through the burned remains.

There – underneath a broken rocking chair – the children’s toys.

A hand on her shoulder held her back. “Don’t do this.”

Her teary eyes met his. “It’s all I have left.”

 

Final Good-Bye

j-hardy-rubble

PHOTO PROMPT © J Hardy Carroll

She stood in the rubble, memories flooding back like ocean waves. She was twenty-two and dressed to the nines. The sounds of jazz and laughter filled the air. Then she saw him and the room faded away. The melody that rang out from his trumpet was like a siren call. She knew he was the one. Sixty years later, after the funeral, when she was alone, she returned to the place where they first met, where she first fell in love. She found the place in shambles, much like her heart. And she said her final good-bye.

Phone Etiquette

inside-the-dinerPHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot

Blurry eyes struggled to focus. A very late night and too many tequila shots led us to this late-night diner.

“You shouldna given ‘im your number.” Tessa’s slurred words rang true and regret filled my veins.

“I got this.” I made a zigzag path down the aisle. “Scuse me. Y’want my phone?”

The girls’ shocked looks never registered as I dropped my phone on the stained Formica counter and wobbled away.

“See. Problem fixed.” I brushed my hands together and dropped into the booth, stuffing a handful of fries into my grinning mouth.

I saw that. ~ Karma

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PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

“My mom is gonna kill me.” Abbie surveyed the damage to the car she had sideswiped while her best friend sat texting.

Without looking up from her phone, Olivia said, “You’re totally right. We should bail.”

“What?!? You’re kidding right?”

“We’re alone. If we leave fast you’re clear. Nobody has to know.”

Abbie scanned the empty street and debated, but the angel on her left shoulder won.

Tucking a note with her name and cell number under the wipers, she saw a good-looking boy exit the house across the street and walk toward her.

Karma isn’t always a bitch.

A huge thanks to Mrs Completely for introducing me to Friday Fictioneers. You should check out her blog. It’s one of my favorites.